Blimp deflator: Letting out the gas

Armchair counter-espionage

Posted in china, new zealand by Blimp deflator on November 3, 2012

Are the Chinese spying on us?
Cartoon from the Manawatu Standard of October 10, 2012. The cartoonist is Malcolm Evans.

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Cloak-and-dagger stuff Down Under

Posted in new zealand by Blimp deflator on November 2, 2012

NZ's new security law
The “new security law” is presumably the Search and Surveillance Act 2012, which provides for “warrantless entry to prevent offence or respond to risk to life or safety” — which means, as far as I can see, that the police can break into your house whenever they like. (See Part 2, Subpart 4.) The legislation also provides for “entry without warrant to find and avoid loss of evidential material relating to certain offences”. The cartoon is from the Manawatu Standard of October 2, 2012. The cartoonist is Malcolm Evans.

Click on the “search and surveillance bill” tag to read earlier comments on this legislation.

The brave new world of body scanners

Posted in uncategorized by Blimp deflator on March 3, 2012

Better get used to body scanners
The above editorial is from the Manawatu Standard of February 8, 2012. My reply, which was published on February 10:

Warwick Rasmussen should keep a copy of his editorial Better get used to body scanners (February 8). With a few minor adjustments, he will be able to use it again when the Surveillance State decides to install body scanners in other locations. The United States is already installing scanners at courthouses, and has hinted at the possibility of deploying them at train and subway stations. The entrances to shopping malls are also likely to see the technology introduced.

Don’t worry about the (imposed) dose of radiation you receive every time you pass through one of the devices. It’s unlikely to do you any harm – unless, of course, the machine malfunctions. And your loss of privacy shouldn’t bother you, unless you’re a member of the transgender community, or a person with breast prostheses, prosthetic testicles, a colostomy bag or a catheter. People in the latter category will probably have to have such equipment physically inspected.

Yes, indeed, a small price to pay for safety.

Body scanners alert